Walkability

Personal health and wellbeing can create significant barriers for older Australians in relation to their ability to walk. As might be expected, our research shows the healthier you perceive yourself to be and the more active you are, the more likely it is you will choose to walk.

 

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The GPS data confirms this finding with the average time spent outside of the home being higher for those participants who stated they do walk as a mode of transport compared to those who did not select this option. Notably, there was no difference in the amount of time spent doing physical activity.

 

Breakdown of average daily activity of participants that walk or don't walk

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The next graph, based on a sub-set of the research sample, aged 60 years and over, suggests that older people’s perception of their health does change as they grow older. For example, none of the participants aged 80 years and over rated themselves as being “very healthy”.

 

people’s perception of their health does change as they grow older

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The graph below, which is based on a sub-set of the research sample, aged 60 years and over,  shows  that older age groups walk less and spend less time driving or being driven per day on average during their week of tracking than younger age groups.

older age groups walk less and spend less time driving or being driven per day on average during their week of tracking than younger age groups
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Those who were active and engaged with their communities were most capable of managing the built and natural environments; however, a number of issues were highlighted that may be addressed to improve walkability including topography, built environment and weather.

 

 

 

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